Kiwi Polemicist

March 24, 2009

• NZ Post reducing service levels again

The comments button is at the bottom right of this post.

The NZ Herald is reporting that NZ Post will no longer empty street mail boxes (street receptacles) on Sundays. Despite price rises we’ve also seen them skipping deliveries after Christmas and on Easter Saturdays. That’s what happens with an effective state monopoly: rising prices and decreasing service levels.

When you purchase a stamp you’re entering into a contract with NZ Post: I will pay you 50 cents to deliver my letter one one of six days of the week, less public holidays. When NZ Post skips a delivery day after Christmas without prior warning they are in breach of that contract, and I cannot find anything on their website that permits this.

Another brick bat while I’m at it: my disabled friends in Auckland report that the Books ‘N’ More franchises in Auckland (they deliver NZ Post services: there’s no such thing as a “Post Office” these days, just NZ Post franchises) are packed to the rafters with stock and extremely difficult to access with guide dogs or wheelchairs. This also affects mothers with prams and people with shopping trundlers. NZ Post should require their franchisees to provide reasonable access for their customers.

What do you think about NZ Post reducing their service levels?

What are your experiences of NZ Post franchises?

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3 Comments »

  1. “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.” Exodus 20:8-11

    In other words, not only are we to not work, but we are to not expect anyone else to work for us. I am very glad to know that when I post a letter I will not be forcing a postie to work on Sunday to deliver it, and they can have a day off too. Posties are people too. So I have no problem with this news, and actually think it is good.

    Comment by Mr Dennis — March 24, 2009 @ 8:58 am

  2. “Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work, but the seventh day is a Sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your male servant, or your female servant, or your livestock, or the sojourner who is within your gates. For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.” Exodus 20:8-11

    In other words, not only are we to not work, but we are to not expect anyone else to work for us. I am very glad to know that when I post a letter I will not be forcing a postie to work on Sunday to deliver it, and they can have a day off too. Posties are people too. So I have no problem with this news, and actually think it is good.

    Comment by Mr Dennis — March 24, 2009 @ 8:58 am

    • Mr Dennis, with respect, there’s a couple of flaws in your reasoning:

      1) they’re stopping the Sunday clearances of street receptacles, but there’s no mention of ceasing the Sunday clearances of ”post offices”

      2) the Old Testament Sabbath was sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, not Sunday. Having Sunday as a ”Sabbath” is merely a cultural construct. The basic principle is that we should rest one day in seven (q.v. Gen 2:2-3) for own benefit, and under the New Covenant that can be any day of the week.

      I would say that Christians should seek a job that allows them to attend church (Heb 10:25) and everyone should seek a job that has time off at a time suitable for family time.

      Comment by Kiwi Polemicist — March 26, 2009 @ 9:47 am


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