Kiwi Polemicist

October 7, 2008

Public nudity, beaches, and excessive regulations – Part 2

Theodore Dalrymple is a doctor who worked in a hospital and a prison in a rough area of London, and I think that a quote from his book Our Culture, What’s Left Of It is relevant to the debate over public nudity that I commented on in an earlier post:

In my hospital … adolescent and young adult visitors to their hospitalized boyfriends or girlfriends not infrequently climb into bed and indulge in sexual foreplay, in full view of the staff and of old people occupying the beds opposite. This gross disinhibition would once have been taken as a sign of madness but is now accepted as perfectly normal: indeed, objection to such behaviour would now appear objectionable and ridiculous.  No one seems to have noticed, however, that a loss of a sense of shame means a loss of privacy; a loss of privacy means a loss of intimacy; and a loss of intimacy means a loss of depth. There is, in fact, no better way to produce shallow and superficial people than to let them live their lives entirely in the open, without concealment of anything.

So very true.  Is the sexual foreplay supposed to be an aid to recovery or is it a sign of recovery?

**********

Click on the book cover to purchase this excellent book from fishpond.co.nz and support Kiwi Polemicist:

Our Culture, What's Left Of It by Theodore Dalrymple

(Click here for a review of Our Culture, What’s Left Of It)

I also recommend Life At The Bottom: both books give insight into the culture of our day and each chapter is a stand-alone essay, which is good if you’re a busy person (click on the book cover to purchase).

(Click here for a review of Life At The Bottom, PDF 1.5 MB, go to page 18)

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. […] Public nudity, beaches, and excessive regulations – Part 3 (Part 1 can be found here and Part 2 is here) […]

    Pingback by Public nudity, beaches, and excessive regulations - Part 3 « Kiwi Polemicist — October 27, 2008 @ 10:52 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: